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Levy Library Blog

Article in the Spotlight: November 2017

by Angelyn Thornton on 2017-11-07T12:00:00-05:00

Each month the Levy Library showcases the achievements of Mount Sinai faculty and researchers by highlighting an article and its altmetrics. Altmetrics are alternative measures of impact that capture non-traditional data like abstract views, article downloads, and social media activity.

This month we highlight the article written by a team of researchers including Mount Sinai’s Ruth Jf F Loos, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Institute of Personalized Medicine.

Citation data: PLoS Genetics, ISSN: 1553-7390, Vol: 13, Issue: 4, Page: e1006528

Publication Year: 2017

Researchers: James E. Hayes, Ruth Jf F Loos

 

 

Summary: 

Physical activity (PA) may modify the genetic effects that give rise to increased risk of obesity. To identify adiposity loci whose effects are modified by PA, we performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses of BMI and BMI-adjusted waist circumference and waist-hip ratio from up to 200,452 adults of European (n = 180,423) or other ancestry (n = 20,029). We standardized PA by categorizing it into a dichotomous variable where, on average, 23% of participants were categorized as inactive and 77% as physically active. While we replicate the interaction with PA for the strongest known obesity-risk locus in the FTO gene, of which the effect is attenuated by ~30% in physically active individuals compared to inactive individuals, we do not identify additional loci that are sensitive to PA. In additional genome-wide meta-analyses adjusting for PA and interaction with PA, we identify 11 novel adiposity loci, suggesting that accounting for PA or other environmental factors that contribute to variation in adiposity may facilitate gene discovery.

 

View article on Plum X

View Dr. Loos' profile on Plum X

 

 

 


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